Skip to main content

About your Search

KRON (MyNetworkTV) 1
( more )
English 53
French 1
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 54 (some duplicates have been removed)
cannot take lightly that the anc and nelson mandela were considered terrorists by much of the western world, including the right wing here. and for mandela to emerge as a prisoner negotiating privately, at great risk, even at the great risk of some that were supporters of his, who didn't know about the negotiations until later. for him to take that move of reconciliation and lead that country into an election, i was an election observer. i remember barbara lee. i have a picture of her and danny glover and all of us at the carlton hotel. it was an amazing time to see people lined up the first time they could vote. for miles and miles, for three days. and they didn't vote on individuals, they voted on parties. but to go from terrorist to being the kind of celebrated statesman. people shouldn't sweep past that. he suffered. many of his colleagues suffered. decades in jail, ostracized. never thought they would see daylight again as free people. but they took that and transformed their country. i was with him when he went to the u.n. and asked for the removal of sanctions. to be around thi
of the anc. he was arrested again in 1962 and tried for his anti-apartheid activity. mandela when sentenced to life in prison in 1964. he would end up spending a quarter of a century behind bars, first in robben island, then in cape town. waves of violence shook the country while he was in prison. forces shoternment dozens of youth and schoolchildren demonstrating peacefully. in the 1980's, the ministrations -- demonstrations and police violence continued. the country's economy collapse. the anti-apartment movement it momentumked up abroad and nelson mandela became its symbol. mandela was eventually innsferred to another prison 1988 when he initiated secret negotiations with the government. in 1990, the ban on the anc was lifted. that year he walked out a free man. mandela was elected president of the anc in 1991. he continued to negotiate with president f.w. de klerk to seek an end to the country's racist laws. both men were awarded the nobel peace prize in 1993. >> we can stop the forward movement of these forces in the country. inapartheid came to an end 1994 when black south africans we
mandela was in his early 40s. he had joined the african national congress, the anc, way back in 1944. the anc and the other major organizations opposing apartheid in south africa had been organized as nonviolent movements, nonviolent resistance, and nonviolent organizing. but after sharpville, they decided that maybe that wasn't enough. after sharpville, they decided they would form a paramilitary wing, and nelson mandela was one of the anc leader who is went underground to help start it. they said they would target government buildings and strategic infrastructure and they would try to sabotage the state. after sharpville, the government of south africa started mass arrests of anc leaders and other activists. they banned the anc. they made it illegal to be a member of that group. nelson mandela was arrested for treason in 1961, he was acquitted and he was convicted of traveling illegally. they sentenced him to five years hard labor on south africa's version of alcatraz, which is robin island. while he was already serving that sentence, while he was already in prison, they put him on
to the anc, the same organization. my grandmother was also a political leader within the anc. >> and your grandmother then also was close to him and visited him in prison, and nelson mandela wrote her. >> several times, and my grandmother would write back. she told me she wrote so many letters, some of which never reached him. a few made it all the way and she put them into a book. and after giving them to the archives. >> having visited him in prison where he suffered, he it tuberculosis, problems with his eyesight. she must have seen the suffering. what did she say or what do you think about how he left prison and had the grace and indignity to invite the gaolers. >> at this point i have to d admit when she came back i thought she'd come back with a message of fighting. let's continue the fight. she said, "you'll be surprised, my grandson, nelson mandela is going to tell us all to reconcile, shake hands with our former enemies." he is convinced he'll be released. she came back convinced the man had not changed. he was for the policies and would reconcile. desmond tutu, the arch bishop a
early 40s. he had joined the african national congress, the anc, way back in 1944. the anc opposing apartheid had been organized as non-violent resistance. but after sharpville, they decided maybe that wasn't enough. after sharpville they decided they would form a paramilitary wing and nelson man delg la was one of the anc leaders who went undergroutd to help it. they would target infrastructure and try to sabotage the state. after sharpville the government of south africa started mass arrests of anc leaders and other activists. they banned the a nchnc. they made it illegal to be a part of that group. nelson mandela was arrested in 1961, again in 1962 and convicted of traveling illegally. they sentenced him to five years hard labor on robben island. while he was already serving that sentence they put him on trial again, this time for sabotage. and they convicted him, and they sentenced him to life in prison, to life on robben island. so in 1964 he began a new sentence that was a life sentence, and for the first 18 years of it his cell on robben island had no bid, no plumbing of any
. it was a process threatened by violence and the smile disappeared as the anc leader berated those he held responsible, including f.w. de klerk. for nelson mandela the process was never personal. >> we are not dealing with a man, with an individual. we are dealing with a government with a system. >> as a country was pushed and pulled towards democracy. nelson mandela and f.w. de klerk were awarded the "the new york observer." then on the 27th of april 1, '94. south africans of all political persuasions and colours went to the polls. among them nelson mandela voting for the first time. he became the president of a country in which he had been an outlaw. one in which he said the people now governed. >> on this day, you the people took your destiny into your own hands. you decided that nothing would prevent you from exercises your hard-won right to elect a government of your choice. >> after one term as president, nelson mandela did what few leaders in the contain anti did before, stepping down with humour and grace. >> the time has come to hand over. >> at the age of 78 nelson mandela tirele
which considered the anc a terrorist group, from margaret thatcher considered the anc a terrorist group and nelson mandela a terrorist. and this is the '80s. there was a lot of resistance to the idea of the government should fall, much less that this die vestment should take place at all. >> this was in the context of the cold war. and one of the most insidious things that the apartheid south african government did was they couched their oppression in terms of the communist struggle, that essentially the anc was riddled through with communists and pro-cubans. when nelson mandela was freed and made this tour. when he got to miami, he was actually rejected by the local government in miami, two mayors of miami and miami dade would not receive mandela because he was perceived as being pro-castro. so there was this whole sort of cold war fight that was tied up in the south african struggle. and it was part of the reason that the reagan administration opposed the idea of sanctions and divestment from south africa. >> please stay with us. >>> coming up, we will look at the presidency of nelson
people. >> reporter: mandela's african national congress, the anc, was banned. he became an outlaw, but he refused to back down. arrested in 1962, mandela was charged with sabotage and with attempting to violently overthrow the government. he was convicted and sentenced to life in prison. for years, for decades the struggle for justice in south africa continued with the imprisoned nelson mandela as its symbol. at times he was forced to break rocks in the hot sun for hours at a time. the government offered mandela freedom if he would renounce violence. he refused. >> today marks the 25th year behind bars for nelson mandela. >> reporter: south africa became an international outcast. facing sanctions, boycotts, and growing political pressure. >> nelson mandela should be released to participate in the country's political process. >> reporter: rock concerts for the cause were broadcast around the world. ♪ hey mandela >> reporter: in 1989, south africa's hard lined president resigned replaced by f. f.w. declerk who began to dismantle apartheid. the ban on anc was lifted. and on februar
and exciting and rewarding experience. visit a man who had been selected by the leadership, to lead the anc during nelson mandela's incarceration. he was given the power and the authority to give instructions to the rest of us who were in the service of that cause. i often heard nelson mandela's voice very clearly through the things that he was doing. it became apparent that we were getting closer and closer to the time when mandela would be freed. many of us looked to that with a great sense of hope, but i never thought i would live long enough to see him released from prison. but he was released -- and i was instructed to help them prepare for the first visit to the united states. capacity, i corresponded nelsonnnie mandela and himself, to set up the kind of environment that would be most rewarding with his visit for the united states. here and i was charged with the responsibility of leading the demands that were made upon us for the visit here. >> that was the very first time the very that was first time, during that excitement i was able to meet you and befriend you, but let me thatfor
, defenseless people. >> reporter: the anc was banned. he became an outlaw, but he refused to back down. arrested in 1962 mandela was charged with sabotage and with attempting to violently overthrow the government. he was convicted and sentenced to life in prison. for decades the struggle for justice in south africa continued with the imprisoned nelson mandela as its symbol. at times he was forced to break rocks in the hot sun for hours at a time. the government offered mandela freedom if he would renounce violence. he refused. >> today marks the 25th year behind bars for nelson mandela. >> reporter: south africa became an international outcast, facing sanctions, boycotts, and growing political pressure. >> nelson mandela should be released to participate in the country's political process. ♪ >> reporter: rock concerts for the cause were broadcast around the world. ♪ hey, mandela >> the release of nelson mandela. >> reporter: in 1989 south africa's hardline president p.w.bota resigned, replaced by f.w. clark who slowly began to dismantle apartheid. the ban on the anc was lifted, and
reel seat of the anc. he was arrested again in nineteen sixty two and try to present iphone type activities. then it was sentenced to life imprisonment in nineen sixty four would end up spending more than a quarter of this entry behind bars this involved a minute opinion polls will make a town moment that it was imprisoned lisa curry poignant shook the country in nineteen seventy six government forces saw dozens of youth and school children who would demonstrate in custody in stewart st. in the nineteen nineties demonstrations and police find its continued state of emergency was declared the country's currency collapsed. meanwhile the anti apartheid movement picked up momentum the board's announcement that it became its living single. several musicians great songs in his armor and writing history the month that it was eventually transferred to pick suppose to prison in nineteen ninety eight when he meets guilty secret negotiations with the government. in nineteen ninety the ban on gays he was lifted to dump every eleven combat team into the warm temps a free man . then it was el
especially to the generation that came up after his story was well known that his organization the anc was not a non-violent organization. it was rough and he surrounded himself with some rough people. >> right. he started out being non-violent. and when he realized that the anc wasn't getting anywhere close to its mission, the group of leaders of the anc decided we need to become a military organization. and he started spear of the nation which was the military wing of the anc. and he taught himself. he read generals. he read caesar. he learned that like he learned everything. and it went against his grain, but again, as i was saying before, he had one overarching goal. and whatever got to that goal, he would do. even embracing violence. as you showed earlier, he refused to not embrace violence to get out of prison. because he said i can't negotiate while i'm in prison. that was the leverage he had. and he understood that. >> when you're in south africa as you know better than most, you don't hear mandela as much as you hear madiba. and as i was saying to charlayne, it's parental, it'
of the nation, aimed at civil installations and not soft or human targets but in times can, the anc their acts bore no comparison to the thousands murdered in otherwise disappeared by the regime. >> there are many people whofeed futile for us to continue talkintalking peace and nonviole against a government whose reply is only savage attacks. well i'm on the defenseless people. >> in 1962 a vishz crack downwas caught up in the regime's wide net. his anc colleagues were rounded up and jailed. in 1963 during what came to be called the ravonia trial, the government tried and convicted mandela and seven of the top command of the anc on charges of sabotage and fomenting revolution. a capital offense. the eight were sentenced to life in prison. even from his cell on robin island, the alcatraz like island, six miles from cape town, mandela was uncompromising, says helen, a parliament service person. >> mattresses, the fact that thr between, and mostly about the behavior of the war den who has a tattoo on the back of his hands of the swastika. he says this man is very bad, he treats us badly. >> but e
joined the congress in his country with the anc formed a resistance. he was charged with treason and life in prison. he was in one of the most remote and harsh african prisons. he was freed at 71. within a few yearsar par years apartheid ended. in 2010 south africa welcomed the first world cup. >>> a freeze warning still in effect across the bay area. this morning people bundled up. this video from the east bay, but it was like that much of the bay area. it will be a little warmer, by that we mean a little warmer. jacqueline, how is it looking now? >> reporter: very very cold, pam. there are already sub freezing temperatures. it is 28 in santa rosa. 30 in vallejo. over toward livermore 29. south bay is 30s. 36 in half moon bay. 35 in san mateo. it will only get colder. widespread frost. on your car wind shield, there could even be black ice. we will stay that way overnight. temperatures range between 24 and 32. clear skies now. the storm will move into the bay area. it will be dropping down. we could see snow locally. >>> in richmond an arrest has been made in a gang rape case. it happene
winnie mandela was, what was apartheid, what is anc, that is african national congress. it took years leading up to dive divestment. because i was fortunate enough to serve on the board of trans africa we were part of the strategy that not only did rallying and arrested at the embassy and took over the south african consulate in los angeles but economic sanctions were extremely important to put pressure on the south african government to help bring down the unconscionable apartheid. so it took work, hard work. >> there was a movement across the country as congressman mentioned on campuses everywhere. i was covering it. ron, you in congress with a number of leaders an then some republicans joining in to try to finally pass the legislation. you authored one piece of legislation. it was compromised and finally passed and overrode veto. jim baker said on "morning joe" today, this was a time when congress took on the foreign policy, first override of foreign policy veto of a president in that century. >> it really was. first let me say, i'm honored to be with my sister and friend maxine wa
. because he became softer, that is not true. the policy of forgiveness reconsideration was always anc policy. so that it didn't take prison to do that. theory jet stream tried to plague down how badly it was treating the prisoners. this photograph was a staged event. >> you didn't know this was taken. >> no, we didn't know this was taken. >> the government was trying to make him think he was only doing light work, the prisoners had wondered why for one day only the laboring became easy, but it was to get tougher later, the laboring moved to what was an open lime quarry, 13 years of hard toll breaking rock, the dazzling reflection of white stone, damaging their eyesight. when they weren't laboring, they were sometimes allowed visits in this gloomy building, his second wife an activist herself came under a travel babb, one stage mandela waited two years between her visits. >> by regulation, there was a minimum of six months between each visit, and also by regulation, there was no contact. a screen between husband and wife, winny would sit on this side, the communication through a speake
, which was always the goal of the anc. and whether one is from nigeria or tanzania or closer to home, mozambique, across africa people rallied behind the anc in that struggle. i think president mandela stood for freedom, and he now stands for integrity and perseverance. the continent needs to move towards that in terms of the next phase of the struggle, which is political freedom has been achieved now. economic freedom is necessary. >> speak a little about your own experience in relation to the perspective of nelson mandela, particularly when it comes to nonviolent protest, and in violence in africa, as well is the work you have done combating aids in africa. >> i really respect president mandela, again, because of his conviction. he was a person who started as he did, in terms of nonviolent struggle against apartheid regime, and at some point he realized the level of repression of the national party required a more robust response, which was moving towards arms struggle. leader likefound a erk who could negotiate with the national party that was now ready after the mass demonstratio
. with him no longer as the spiritual leader of the anc. at least no longer on this earth. what is that going to do to politics going forward? >> when he walked away and said don't call me, i'll call you, he left politics. so for a number of years now, he has not been on the scene. i think to a certain extent, that's unfortunate. i think that this young democracy is having some missteps. >> it does feel that way. >> a few stumbles. it's difficult because mandela has not been there to way in. maybe at this moment when people are not on the streets, but contemplating what mandela stood for, they might come to a better moment than they are in currently. >> put into perspective, that was an amazing three or four-year period in history. when you look back, it's stunning and like how did we lose the momentum? we were almost there. >> it takes -- you did have prague and the berlin wall and the leaders who were able to have a vision. bush 41 had a vision in terms of german reunionification. there were leaders in different parts of the world. >> who seize the moment. >>a i new economic freedom was not
in south africa. but having him work with his team and the pollster for the anc during that first election, there were three things that really struck me. one was just his enormous clarity and vision for the country and bringing the country together. the second was his great pragmatism. there were a set of election rules that came down that were really disadvantageous to mandela and to the anc. we were all very upset by those rules, and he was just very calm and said no, we'll make it work. find a way to make it work. he refused to fight over the rules and just said we'll make it work. >> give us some unsight into that. what were his unique qualities that allowed him to make it work? in the face of what seemed to be something that was very difficult if not insurmountable. >> i think, first of all, was just the clarity of his own vision. the amount of thinking that he had done about where he wanted to take the country and what reconciliation meant. and how he had already put that to practice. that was so fundamental to his soul. and what was interesting is, of course, there were many factio
president reagan tried to veto sanctions. they called the anc a terrorist organization. however, democrats and republicans came together and imposed those sanctions as it was seen as a point of leverage trying to put some economic pressure on south africa to cf1 oapartheid and free nelson >> some real complexities there. libby casey thank you. ♪ >>> some encouraging news for jobs and the economy today, patricia sabga has the details of the much better than expected november employment reports. >> reporter: for the second straight month the u.s. job market showed signs of improve. the economy added 203,000 jobs in november lowering the unemployment rate to 7%. labor secretary says the numbers indicate the economic recovery is gaining strength. >> we have now had 45 consecutive months of private sector job growth to the tune of 8 million plus jobs. roorp while the numbers are encouraging, analysts say we still have a long way to go? >> to get to full employment we estimate the economy is going to have to create between 200 and 225,000 jobs per month for the next couple of years. >> reporte
. >> reporter: he was a boxer who became a lawyer and a leading voice in the african national congress, the anc. struggling to end the inequality of apartheid, white ruled south africa's viciously enforced policy of racial segregation. but in 1960 after police shot and killed 49 protestors, the anc which had always been nonviolent created a military wing under mandela's command. >> there are many people who feel that it's useless and futile for us to continue talking peace and nonviolence against the government. these are savage attacks. >> reporter: the regime determined to maintain white rule saw the inspiring young revolutionary as a threat. >> our struggle is a truly national one. it is a struggle for the right to live. >> reporter: mandela was imprisoned in 1962 and two years later sentenced to life in prison, accused of working to overthrow the government. in court, on trial for his life he said this. >> i have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society. it is an ideal for which i hope to live for and to see realized, but my lord, if it needs be, it is an ideal for which i am pr
killed 69 people. at the time, nelson mandella was in his early 40s. the anc and the other major organizations opposing apartheid has been nonviolent organizing. they decided maybe that wasn't enough and nelson mandella was one of the leaders who went underground to help start it. they would try to sabotage the state. they banned the amc. they made it illegal to be a member of that group. nelson mandella was arrested for treason in 1961. in 1962, he was convicted of traveling illegally. while he was already serving that sentence, while he was already in prison, they put him on trial again, this time for sabotage. they convicted him and sentenced him to life on robin island. he began a new sentence that was a life sentence. and for the first 18 years of it, his cell had no bed, no plumbing of ne kind. he was permitted one visitor per year for 30 minutes. he became a symbol, worldwide, of the fight to stop apartheid. the south african government would not allow a picture of him to be taken in prison for decades. so the image was always him when he had been locked away. he served 27
that as a particular front, and i think that the way mandela operated certainly was present in the anc, was to provide influence people that he was on the right coarse. and if you weren't persuaded that was fine as well. so i always think of him as someone who didn't know his opposition as a club or a shield, he used it to try to unite the country. at our first meeting after he became president and i was elected leader of party in may 1994. he asked me to have breakfast in cape town, and he said, you know, toni, the opposition must hold up a mirror to the government. and we might not always like what we see in it, but that is a democracy. and he was pretty true to that. if you [ inaudible ] on certain toes of his organization, he was none too happy, but i think in the main he lived up to the ideals that he set out for the >> nelson mandela leaves a lasting legacy across the africa continent. let's hear from malcolm who has been speaking to a uganda journalist. >> we are outside of uganda's sports stadium. it was built in 1997 and it was named after nelson mandela. mandela visited uganda on several occ
of reaction from friends. , manyiends from the anc of whom were in prison with him. they are really paying tribute did topast and what he make south africa the nation it is today. so far it is a quiet, somber mood. people are doing their best to highlight what he did for the country. well on the positives. >> happens next? -- what happens next? >> always know so far and this is from state tv broadcast is flown tobody has been militia hospital. we are expecting an announcement shortly telling us what the funeral arrangements will be. when everything will take place. i suspect a lot of international leaders will start arriving in the country for the funeral and we are expecting a rather long process where the nation will reflect on his life and there events lots of culminating in a few days time. >> thank you so much for all of that. we will keep on crossing live to johannesburg for the paris latest. back. the office at goldman sachs joins us with more on nelson mandela's impact on the country. >> a number of big stories to focus on. later today we will get the u.s. jobs reports. our markets
fantastic, so jail didn't hurt them. nelson mandela picked up that movement, at the anc. he was influenced by gandhi, and as that movement continues after gandhi went back to india, my family continues as part of the antiapartheid movement. and lost business as a result of they role. but we returned my family returned before the election, were were all given citizen ship. i am a sout african citizes well. and we have shared in this new beginning, which everybody looses hope in, but the fact is nelson mandela avoidedded a blood bath a civil war, and he create add remarkable nation. >> he spent time with the african national congress when it was in excite, stephen, give us your thoughts tonight. >> well, it is a very sad moment. this was a great man. it was true, in some ways her understated not just to dignity, and not just perseverance. but what he was able to exhibit when he took the country forward. there would be no rainbow nation today. i think he was essential for the progress of south africa to becoming what we would regard today as the civilized part of the world. >> obviously he ha
to continue talking peace and nonviolence against the government, is on these attacks. >> the anc was out lawed and in 1964, mandela was sentenced to life in prison, attempting to over throw the government. imprisoned on robbins island, he became a powerful symbol of resistance. he was released from prison in 1990 and emerged as the face of the antiapart i'd movement. he appeared before a standing room crowd at the oakland colosseum. >> it is you, the people of oakland, the people of the bay area, who have given me and my delegation strength and hope to grow. >> mandela stepped into negotiations with fk declerk to bring multieration-ratial democracy. he was the first black president. >> so help me god. never, and never again, shall it be that this beautiful land will again experience the oppression of one or another. >>> thousands of people have responded on our facebook page on the passing of mandela. you can join a conversation by going to ktvu chan 2 on facebook. >>> bart apologized for yesterday's emergency that stranded 700 people in a smokey disabled train. the train came to a stop?
police opened fire on black protesters. 69 people, including 10 children were dead. it pushed the anc to armed struggle. >> i feel that it is useless for us to continue talking peace and non-violence against a government -- >> the anc was outlawed and in 1964 nelson mandela was sentenced to life in prison, convicted of attempting to over throw the government. he became a symbol of resistance. after 27 years he was released in 1990. and emerged as the face of the anti-apartheid movement. four months later he appeared before a standing room only crowd at the oakland coliseum. >> it is you, the people of oakland, the people of the bay area who have given me and my delegation strength and hope. >> free man nelson mandela stepped into negotiations to bring democracy to south africa. in 1993 honored with the noble peace prize. a year later nelson mandela became south africa's first black president. >> never, and never again should it be that this beautiful land will again experience the oppression of one by another. let freedom ring. >> nelson former south african president nelson mandela
and the anc and supporters of the inkata freedom party, who wanted no negotiations with the government that held them down. thousands were killed in black on black fighting. his marriage to winnie mandella, a powerful political force was crumbling. the woman who supported him during incarceration was accused of having affairs and being linked to the murderous violence in south africa. they finally divorced. through it all they led the country to broader democracy and in 1994 nelson mandela voted for himself in a free election. he won and was inaugust rated as the first black president of his country. >> on this day, you took your destiny in your own hands. you decided that nothing could prevent you from exercising your hard-won right to elect a government of your choice. >> he served one term, leading reforms in child health care and education. modernizing infrastructure. and healing. >> his close relationship with leaders like muammar gaddafi and castro drew criticism, he still visited the white houses meeting with three sitting american properties. in 2002 george w. bush presented hi
arrests for peaceful protests, anc's protest land mandela in prison for 27 years on charges of attempting to overthrow the government. the terms were notorious and brutal. the sentence confined him to a small cell for 27 years. for 18 of those years, mandela was allowed only one visitor a year for 30 minutes. he was able to write and receive one letter every six months and he was sentenced to hard labor. in those same decades that mandela lost his eldest son and mother, he was not allowed to attend their funerals. the miracle of mandela, after missing three decades of his life, after being closed off from three decades of change in the world mandela emerged without bitterness and without spite. upon his release mandela emerged hopeful. so hopeful he remained committed to working with the very same people who once imprisoned him all in the name of finding a solution for the people of south africa. when i walked out of prison, he wrote in his autobiography, it was my mission to liberate the oppressed and oppressor both. to be free is not merely to cast off one's chains but live in a way tha
to the truth. the united states was against the anc, the african national congress, because they were communists, they were backed by the ussr, and the united states being staunchly anti-communist, that's the right team, but they might have made the wrong choice. likewise, nelson mandela mail d the same exact mistake. he embraced countries like cuba, he misidentified them as comrades, when it should have been the people in the countries he identified with, because they were people under the thumb of gadhafi and under the thumb of khomeini and other nondemocratic countries. one thing you learned is how ideology at times can blind you to some very important facts. in the '80s, i was staunch anti-communist. i didn't pay attention to south africa. all i knew the anc was being backed by comb anytime munists learned that south africa was wrong. if you feel really strongly about this man, you can still act, because there's plenty of people around the world who are under the thumb of evil. and there's a lot of celebrities who don't care. there are women still being circumcised in africa. it's
't even tell his anc colleagues that he was doing that. they negotiated for years in private in order to get this done. the persistence, the courage to do that was incredible. >> incredible courage and many occasions, he went against the leadership of the anc, the political movement. and didn't tell them or when he did tell them, he would essentially say i know this is not what you want me to do, but i feel it is the thing we must do and almost all instances, he was proven correct and he was somebody -- >> go ahead, had the respect of them so that they trusted him even though they had great reservations about the other side. >> they had great reservations. they argued with him. but never the less, he was so deserving of trust that even when they disagreed with him, they knew he was the leader and not the leader in a sense of i'm in charge, but in a sense of i am the purpose, the vision, the one who's going to get us there, so trust me. come along with me. walk with me and that was his great strength. >> thank you so much. >> we'll have much more on the life of nelson mandela and talk
understand from many high ranking anc officials homeland security continues to treat some of them as needing a waiver to get into the united states, which is an embarrassment and what secretary rice said today, at the time, we can't allow president mandela, a man of his stature to be continue to be treated as a terrorist by the united states. we needed to do this and do it before he passed away. but also, we need to honor his memory today by also making sure that homeland security honors of legislation that secretary kerry and for that matter senator obama when they were both senators, helped to pass. so, yes, officially they are off the terror list but the way in which homeland security continues to interpret the laws, they are creating problems for the united states. >> that history is a reminder as we're in a moment of what we call international unity, the foreign policy legacy of everything related to the apartheid regime was divided in this country and many other nations. you look at say the early origins of investment campaign where a young barack obama as a student was involved, many
in the anc's past and mandela said nice things about fidel castro and freedom in cuba that are false and that maybe because we bend over so backwards to show respect that that creates an opening. >> if there's anyone in modern history -- >> you disagree. i do, too. i'm just saying. >> we all agree if there's anyone in modern or world history that deserves sort of to be put on a pedestal, it's nelson mandela. >> of course. >> a few historical figures, right. but i think on both sides there is this danger of sort of writing out of history some of the controversial parts of his life that made him a great leader, made him able to end apartheid in that country. he took some very strong idealogical stands that are controversial to this day. conservatives were on the wrong side of history on a lot of these issues in the '70s and '80s. ted cruz doesn't have to worry about that. he's in his early 40s. he doesn't have to pay attention to that. >> what's extraordinary about mandela is his life's evolution. he started off as a militant, then was a political prisoner, then he became the national
the internet that had infected the anc could net the rule south africa anyone who's to say was that an african dance and it was the syndicate saving the us not to be even more today to intensive rehabilitation if you like but not to let my dad was on that evidence and he and his face is wet dream and that takes basic until it faces two thousand and eight but knowing it's off to the presidency of south africa was already a bath now my cody coldest it has been a canvas and wood seats have i done this life i've been south africa. he's the man who pulled a couple of the divine good and bad from the brink of civil war the man who lost a tree tea sipping coffee is behind bars will be from prison. in his heart was not to change. well i think that his greatest legacy to this country is reconciliation. in the last phoebe cates the world's highest peak in each of nelson mandela. and in each recognizable the world of nikko cooke coda is pretending that a man who struggle for racial be quite a kicking some because reading like the noise he had a dark side. the wound has conveniently forgotten about the a
't know even though he'd negotiated with the regime whether he'd go free and say to his a.n.c. buddies "okay, let's get them" and create rivers of blood. or whether he was there to lead the nation. and we didn't know for 24 hours. that night he gave a long, rambling boring speech and we were worried the next morning he gave a news conference and he called on reporters from the pro-apartheid papers, he treated them like friends and he was eloquent and funny and gracious and i thought "maybe he can do it." >> pelley: was there any single experience that you had in all the experiences you had in south africa that gave you a real measure of the man? >> yes, and it had nothing to do with him. i went to the island, robben island, several times and once i just went and stood on this barren rock and you could see cape town. you could see cape town from there. and i recommend to anyone who wants to get a measure of the man to just stand on that rock for a couple of hours and then try to imagine what it would be like being there for 27 years. and then try to imagine what it would be like getting
the roadshow in the 1990's when he was released from with very also spoke difficult people that were very anc at that time and he managed to get them on his side. some of them into government. >> he would go and have conversations. it was not a fight. >> did he appear in the foot bill world. football world cup? >> yes, it was very brief. what was interesting about the world cup was that we were very skeptical as whether south africa was going to be able to host it. we were waiting for them to announce. we are definitely going to be hosting the world cup, there is no way. he made the effort to arrive. am sure the changes the last minute when they saw him. >> a big draw, for clock today. can put out the favorites. the articles are a lot more balanced than the title might suggest that it is a strong ja drop. >> the england manager says emma put a bet on england. -- says to put a bet on england. >> "countdown" continues in the second hour. >> these statements have not been evaluated. thank you for watching. if you are suffering fm
congress, the anc, was banned. he became an outlaw, but he refused to back down. arrested in 1962, mandela was charged with sabotage and with attempting to violently overthrow the government. he was convicted and sent to life in prison. for years, for decades, the struggle for justice in south africa continued with the imprisoned nelson mandela as its symbol. at times, he was forced to break rocks in the hot sun for hours at a time. the government offered mandela freedom if he would renounce violence. he refused. >> today marks the 25th year behind bars for nelson mandela. >> south africa became an international outcast, facing sanctions, boycotts, and growing political pressure. >> nelson mandela should be released to participate in the country's political process. >> rock concerts for the cause were broadcast around the world. ♪ hey mandela >> in 1989, south africa's hard line president resigned, replaced by f.w. de-clark who slowly began to dismantle apartheid. the ban of the anc was lifted and on february 11th, 1990, nelson mandela walked to freedom. >> nelson mandela, free at last a
was an advocate of nonviolence. becoming a leading voice in the african national congress, the anc. but in 1960, after police shot and killed 69 protesters, the anc, which had always been nonviolent, created a military wing, under mandela's command. >> there are many people who feel that it is useless and futile for us to continue talking peace and nonviolence against a government whose reply is only savage attacks. >> reporter: undaunted by the brutality and inequality that was apartheid rule, mandela remained determined to end the government's forced racial segregation. >> our struggle is a truly national one. it is a struggle for the right to live. >> reporter: a struggle that led to mandela's imprisonment in 1962. and two years later, a life sentence for working to overthrow the government. >> i have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society. it is an ideal for which i hope to live for and to see realized. but my lords, if it needs be, it is an idea for which i am prepared to die. >> reporter: four miles off the coast of capetown, south africa, on robben island, mandela spent mos
and the anc during his long imprisonment and democrats had supported sanctions on south africa so he wanted to be there, he wanted to be at our convention. he later came to the inauguration. and then hillary and vice president gore led a delegation to his inauguration in '94 and just five months later, he came to the united states on a state visit. that's when we really started becoming friends and i had the honor of working with him throughout the entire span of his presidency and one of the things that sometimes gets lost in the incredible personal impact he made on the world because of the way he handled imprisonment is that he was a very, very good president. i think he was an extremely effective president of south africa. >> i remember when you and hillary clinton and the first lady toured that robben island cell where he had spent so many years back in 1998. what was that like? >> well, it was amazing. he talked to me about it and i'll never forget, one of the most enduring conversations i had with him over the many we had in our 20 year friendship was i said you know, i know how you
that -- >> yeah, there was who ran ifpd and shootouts and gunfights. i remember going to a lot of anc funerals and ifc funerals -- >> very touch and go. >> given that election -- >> even in the month before, two months before i remember a huge gunfight in johannesburg. >> one of the things, anderson, we walked together on a long walk of freedom that ended at his inauguration. he wanted to do another book not so much from that period to the presidency but how close south africa came to a civil war. i have to say, i don't want to -- the smirks, the reputation of mr. declerk and formed a partnership and couldn't have done it without each other. mandela in conversations with me for "a long walk to freedom" did feel betrayed during the creation of the constitution and that famous scene when they were writing the constitution he chewed out declerk. >> and declerk knows that. he said we have our spots. >>> we'll take a break quick. robin, christiane, rick, donna, stay with us. tweet about your thoughts on mandela and his massing and legacy. use hash tag ac 36 0. charty and friendship. i'll speak with
and it had been illegal to publish his picture or utter his name to, in fact, to sing the anc national anthem. there were so many changes in that year when i was a young journalist in south africa. >> thanks very much. and again those are the pictures in the lower screen, the people outside nelson mandela's home tonight. the world reacting to the death of nelson mandela. dr. ben carson is here next as our coverage of this breaking news continues. >>> okay, everyone, it's time to ha i >>> the world is remembering nelson mandela. politicians and celebrities taking to facebook and twitter posting their condolences. former president bill clinton tweeting this photo with this caption, i will nevertheless forget my friend. and george w. bush posting, he was one of the great forces for freedom and equality of our time. he bore his burdens with dignity and grace. he will be miss but his contributions will live on forever. >>> and john boehner tweeted. and condoleeza rice posting, throughout history a few special people have been able to transcend differences and change theor the better. nelson mandel
, a public mostly anc memorial service at the local soccer stadium here in johannesburg where the football world cup final was held. some heads of states, perhaps barak obama will attend that. then we will see three days of lying in state. 2340u what will be symbol ec about that is that he will lie in state at the steps of the union building in nearly the same place where he took his oath of office to become the first democratically elected president. once that process is over on day nine essentially of this program, he will be flown by military aircraft along with the elders vip political figures and his family, which is large, they'll be flown down to his hometown and then the military, the state will effectively hand over his body, his coffin, his casket to the family at the get as of the homeinstead, i think from what we understand there will be a shift from moving the south african flag to putting a blanket over his casket, which will symbolize him coming home to his ancestral land. then there will be atate funeral in the ground of his ancestral home in the hills where he walked and p
africa membership of the anc, nelson mandela's organization, was a crime. his image was forbidden. his words from absolutely outlawed. even the possession of a coffee cup with his image on it was grounds for imprisonment. for all those years that he was in prison his image was absolutely obliterated. generations of south africans, grew up without knowing what he looked like, without knowing his speech or knowing his words. to know the absolutely joy that gripped the country when he and other african leaders were released from prison. here is somebody that had been spoken about in the quiet. that had been spoken about behind closed doors. anyone with support for him or his organization would mean imprisonment, banishment, and could mean and did mean in many cases, death. to understand the changes within this country one has to go back to that period of time when the person who's death and life is being celebrated at the moment was vilified, and regarded as subversive, regarded as a traitor to this state and many other states, and this shows you how time changes. south africans, in parti
here as well that there was an expose about groups founded specifically to undermine the anc and to try to boost the image of south africa here in the west. so in terms of history when they -- you've got bill o'reilly saying he was a communist. >> last night. let me show that. about nelson mandela on fox. nelson mandela, i spent some time in south africa. he was a communist, this man. he was a communist. all right? >> don't you wonder where it was in south africa? it wasn't like he was hanging out in soweto, that bill o'reilly. i'm quite certain. and of course he doesn't understand the complexity of what the communist party in south africa was at the time. they had a short-term similar goal. >> well, let me show you what the head of the republican party rush limbaugh had to say. or let me let you hear it. >> nelson mandela has more in common or had more in common with clarence thomas than he does with barack obama. mandela had much more in common with clarence thomas. and a lot of conservatives. >> i'm not too good on limbaugh lingo, so could you interpret? >> remember this is the same
'm a loyal member of the anc. the world had changed and had to go away from the socialist philosophy. he changed radically in a very short amount of time. one of the things he always said to me, he was never high bound about haenging his mind. he said when circumstances change i changed my mind. what do you do. another great lesson for politicians. so he evolved so tremendously when he came out of prison. it was astonishing to watch. >> it is astonishing. incredible story. >> the transition between icon to being in power is one of those impossible things to do. >> it was much more difficult coming out of prison and being a practical politician than being in prison. mandela's greatest teacher said i haven't had a good night's sleep since i left prison because now have responsibility. >> in 1994 brian williams interviewed nelson mandela. he asked him about his predecessor f.w. de klerk. >> my relationship with mr. de klerk and he's one of those south africans that i hold in high regard. we have had differences where we said cruel things to each other but at the end of the day, we're able t
that traditional tribal situation in south africa with the revolutionary moment of the anc and with white south africans. that was another amazing triumph of his. >> how perfectly appropriate that his homecoming will be in that place that he found so tranquil and peaceful. i want to talk to you about his time in prison. did you get a sense there was a defining moment that that shift happened for him? in prison, men are broken. he wasn't broken. >> yes. whatever the psychologists said, the same fire that melts the butter hardens the egg. it hardened him, it didn't melt him. one of the things about him, the man who went to prison was a different man that came out. >> he was hot headed. >> hot headed, tempestuous. pricen w prison was the crucible that hardened him. one day he said to me, i came out mature. very rare, a mature man. >> i told you, he said it to more than just you, why he is adamant that i am not a saint. he said that often. >> i think there's a lesson for all of us. he wasn't a saint. what he was was -- and he was proud to call himself this -- he was a politician, a politician that
-communist and he never lost that. there were parts of his coalition, the anc, that were pro-communist. correct me if i'm wrong, but mandela always down through the years, when he got his freedom, when he took office and afterwards, was a firm anti-communist. >> well, he was -- i don't know fully whether he was a firm anti-communist in the sense of what you call soviet communism, but he was firm in that he did not want to give the impression that he was going to turn black nationalism into black racial discrimination against whites. >> i think that really is the point, mr. johnson. he was first and foremost an african nationalist. there were communists who wanted to coopt, if you will, the movement there and he once famously went onstage at a rally of i believe the african national congress and tore up the posters of the communists who had tried to sort of commandeer the movement over there. larry, a moment ago used the word forgiveness. there was a divineness about this man's spirit, wasn't there? >> i think you would have to say if anybody would ever dare say that someone carried a christ-like m
been a lot of talk about the white and black violence there was a tremendous violence between the anc and cata rival movement, lack of social trust. so you could have drawn a very negative scenario for south of ca. in fact, i ronuously did so in some of my reporting down there because i just felt bad social fabric. and it's very hard for leaders to counterago that. >> woodruff: even after he was released. >> right, i was involved in riot, people getting killed. it was ugly. and yet i think by force of moral example h thises with one of those rare case when somebody at the top of society really has a cultural effect. and leads, really averts what could have been quite a disaster. and the country did much, much better in the ensuing years. i think because sheer moral example. >> woodruff: mark, what about you? what do you think of when you think of him? >> well,-- some leaders are respected, and few leaders are loved. nelson mandela is that unique figure who is both loved and respected, virtually around the globe. it's a remarkable achievement. and what i think of is he described resent
he was released from prison at his home. withs my husband in 1986 theer tonbo who was heading a.n.c. when nelson was in prison. but when you went to south was likeen, it futilism. it was hard to explain to americans and others throughout how utterly devastated beingsority of the human who lived in south africa were. back in when i went 1998, which was about four years the first re-election, a friend of mine invited me to out on to the beach. and i had never stepped on the beach before because it had "whites only" and i didn't feel capable of stepping -- and walking on to beach, it was like shields were lifted from my eyes because to see the been able beauty of capetown before. families, muslim families, asian families, white families running on the beach. to nelson mandela. >> absolutely. >> pretty incredible. liberations. >> thank you so much to our entire panel. bright, selloake hatang. we'll be back after this break. >> all this week we've been talking about bubbles in housing, stocks, i.p.o.s. but there's one bubble that's, perhaps, bigger than the rest. bitcoin, the value of th
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 54 (some duplicates have been removed)